James M. Landry

Published Articles

Examining several attempts to change the way in which science is taught in the K–16 levels.

James M. Landry is a professor of chemistry and professor and chair of natural science at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemistry from Xavier University and Ph.D. degree in inorganic chemistry from Miami University of Ohio. His research has included collaboration with the Getty Conservation Institute to develop methods to analyze art objects using infrared microspectroscopy and determine museum environments employing gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. He was involved in the Los Angeles Collaborative for Teacher Excellence, an NSF funded collaborative of ten colleges working to improve the preparation of future K-12 science and math teachers. More recently, he has conducted research on the presence of heavy metals in the Ballona Wetlands, an urban wetlands in Los Angeles soon to undergo restoration. He has been involved in the development of the Ballona Discovery Center, a モmuseum without wallsヤ adjacent to the Ballona Wetlands for use by K-12 classes, colleges, and the public. In 1996, he and Dr. Louke van Wensveen developed an award winning course entitled モScience, Theology, and the Futureヤ funded though the Center for Theology and Natural Science in Berkeley, CA by the John Templeton Foundation. Currently, he and Dr. Chris Chapple are co-chairs of the Teilhard Religion and Science Society, a Metanexus Local Society.

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